Install a bunch of MacOS applications using JumpCloud Commands

This post is going to be the fourth post regarding JumpCloud Commands in the last couple of weeks. This post is going to talk you through how to Install a bunch of MacOS applications using JumpCloud Commands that I am using in my environment. I hope you find them all helpful.

Block macOS Catalina

The first command is a simple one to start. In my environment, we always run a major macOS version behind the latest version. So to block the new macOS Catalina update, set this as a command and let it run as Root once for every machine. This will stop the System Preferences icon lighting up to say there are updates.

softwareupdate --ignore "macOS Catalina"

Hide a User from the macOS Login window

The next command is to hide a user from the login window and /Users/ folder. The reason I use this is that I have a local admin setup on every machine. It just makes the whole device look cleaner when you are handing it to new starts if there the only user on the mac. You can still log in to it by typing the username and password in the dialogue box. To use this command change, the bit in bold to the account name of the user that you want to hide. Then run it once on each machine.

dscl . create /Users/username IsHidden 1; chflags hidden /Users/username

Install Slack for macOS, Has moved here

Install Google Drive File Stream for macOS, has moved here

Install Zoom, has moved here.

Install Keka, has moved here

As always if there are any other commands, you would like me to write, and test don’t hesitate to leave a comment or find me on twitter.com

2 thoughts on “Install a bunch of MacOS applications using JumpCloud Commands”

  1. Hello Rich,

    Quick question in regards to the Zoom install Command. Would i be able to run this against all my MacOS systems to “Update” Zoom instead of “Install” Zoom? Zoom has been coming out with a handful of updates and i would like to have a way to update the client applications on my MacOS systems instead of grant everyone “Sudo” and then revoke everyone.

    Help is always appreciated.

    Thanks!
    Matt

    Reply
    • Hi Matt

      Thanks for coming by!

      The Zoom script downloads the latest version direct from Zoom. So as long as Zoom pushes that version live then it should overwrite the older versions.

      I hope that helps.

      R

      Reply

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